RR Donnelley Press Exploring Sale

first_imgThe memo refutes some of the framing of that article however, claiming that it was Press+ who initiated discussions around a sale several months ago. Founders Steven Brill and Gordon Crovitz would not comment directly, but their memo says they’re looking for international opportunities and new markets that RR Donnelley doesn’t offer at the moment.”Press+ might be better able to take advantage of the opportunities offered for international expansion and—with our new video meter—expansion into new content markets by having a home with a different kind of partner,” they say.Brill and Crovitz also hint at possible expansion under new ownership.The group, previously known as Journalism Online, has grown rapidly in the two-and-a-half years since it was purchased by RR Donnelley for a reported $35 million. With less than 30 clients at that time, Press+ now says it has about 450 with more on the way. A London-based business development director was hired in June with the intent of expanding the company’s presence internationally.The move would ultimately be a minor one for RR Donnelley which generated $2.6 billion in net sales for the third quarter and acquired Consolidated Graphics for $620 million last month.The Press+ platform, launched in 2009, is based on a freemium content model. Visitors get a set number of stories (usually around 10) for free and are asked to pay for access to more.The memo from Brill and Crovitz:You may have seen, or will see, a report from Ken Doctor [of Nieman Journalism Lab] that RR Donnelley is “shopping” Press+. Although “shopping” is not accurate, what is going on is that a few months ago we began discussing with RRD the possibility that now that we have grown so fast, Press+ might be better able to take advantage of the opportunities offered for international expansion and – with our new video meter – expansion into new content markets by having a home with a different kind of partner. At the same time, RRD could be rewarded for its early investment. (Remember: when they bought us, we had just a dozen or two launched Affiliates.) Put simply, they’v been an ideal partner, and this is a possibility we are exploring together.Nothing is certain. We are under no pressure to do anything; we are simply considering various possibilities. And if we do change or add partners, the two of us aren’t going anywhere (and, if anything, in this scenario the staff would probably be expanding more quickly).We will keep you posted, but don’t expect any big announcements soon. And please keep this confidential. Steve and Gordon *Editor’s note: Folio: is a Press+ client.RR Donnelley’s digital paywall platform, Press+, is on the market, according to an internal memo obtained by Folio:.Nieman Journalism Lab broke the news that the company was being “shopped” on Wednesday.last_img read more

Advent of Cold Plasma

first_img This new device which is a major improvement on the earlier plasma jet devices has been developed by Mounir Laroussi and XinPei Lu at the Old Dominion University in Virginia, could be used to kill bacteria, heal wounds and treat plaque.At atmospheric pressure, most plasmas are so hot (thousands of degrees centigrade) that they would immediately kill any living cells they come into contact with. Moreover, these high-temperature plasmas are also very difficult to control. In recent years, however, researchers have developed techniques for producing low-temperature plasmas and some of these have been used in biomedical applications. However, till now the replacement were not very reliable.A good low-temperature plasma source must be able to work at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Moreover, it should be hand-held and must not “arc” and heat up while operating. The new device developed by Laroussi and Lu consists of two electrodes, each made of a thin copper ring attached to the surface of a glass disk: the disk is about 2.5 centimetres across and has a small hole at its centre. These electrodes are then inserted into a dielectric tube and are separated by a gap that can be varied between 0.5 and 1 centimeter.When helium gas is injected into the tube and short (less than one microsecond) high-voltage pulses are applied to the electrodes, a discharge is ignited in the gap between the electrodes. This produces a plasma plume that is ejected through the hole in the outer electrode. The plume can be up to 5 centimetres long, with the length depending on the flow rate of the helium and the size of the voltage pulses. The plume remains at room temperature and can be touched by bare hands.The device is an improvement on previous plasma “jet” devices that only generate short plumes that have lengths in the millimetre range and can reach temperatures several tens of degrees above room temperature. And unlike other devices, such as the “plasma needle”, the new apparatus contains no sharp metal objects. And since very short voltage pulses are used, there is no risk of arcing and heating if the device is deployed for long periods.This development of cold plasma can have far reaching effects not only in biomedical sciences, but also in all areas where plasma are used. Its portability has added benefit. This might help the scientists and researchers use plasma in other fields.Dr. Bikram Lamba, an international management consultant, is Chairman & Managing Director of Tormacon Limited- a multi-disciplinary consultancy organization.He can be contacted at 9058484205. Email: torconsult@rogers.com, site: www.torconsult.com .by Dr. Bikram Lamba, Copyright 2005 PhysOrg.com Researchers have developed a new hand-held device that can produce room-temperature plasmas for diverse applications, most important for biomedical applications. Citation: Advent of Cold Plasma (2005, September 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2005-09-advent-cold-plasma.html Explore furthercenter_img A next-generation triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) to realize constant current from electrostatic breakdown This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more